Don't Ignore Flat Feet

Treatment and prevention of adult flatfoot can reduce the incidence of additional foot problems such as bunions, hammertoes, arthritis and calluses, and improve a person’s overall health.

Overweight males in white-collar jobs are most apt to suffer from adult flatfoot disorder, a progressive condition characterized by partial or total collapse of the arch, according to the research.  Symptoms of adult flatfoot include pain, swelling, flattening of the arch and an inward rolling of the ankle. But because flatfoot is a progressive disorder by nature, the study suggests that neglecting treatment or preventive care can lead to arthritis, loss of function of the foot and other painful foot disorders.

Flatfoot disorder may gradually worsen to the point that many of the tendons and ligaments in the foot and ankle are simply overworking, often to the point where they tear and/or rupture.

In many cases, flatfoot can be treated with non-surgical approaches including orthotic devices or bracing, immobilization, physical therapy, medication and shoe modifications. In some patients whose pain is not adequately relieved by conservative treatments, there are a variety of surgical techniques available to correct flatfoot and improve foot function.

As in most progressive foot disorders, early treatment for flatfoot disorder is also the patient’s best route for optimal success in controlling symptoms and additional damage to the feet. The goal is to keep patients active, healthy and as pain free as possible.

If you suspect you have a flatfoot disorder or have foot discomfort, call our office for an evaluation.

Author
Dr. Scott Carrington Scott Carrington, DPM, is a fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeon restoring mobility in patients throughout the community of Castle Rock, Colorado, at Castle Rock Foot & Ankle Care. A highly skilled clinician, Dr.Carrington specializes in trauma, foot and ankle reconstruction, sports medicine, arthroscopy, cartilage restorations, and total ankle replacements. A native of Colorado, he attended Cherry Creek high school and went on to complete his undergraduate studies at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He received his medical degree from Des Moines University College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery in Des Moines, Iowa. As part of his education, Dr. Carrington completed a competitive scientific research fellowship in which he performed more than 300 hours of research. Dr. Carrington returned to Denver for residency training at the highly competitive Highlands Presbyterian/St. Lukes hospital program for Podiatric Medicine and Surgery. He then went on to complete a rigorous fellowship for foot and

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